Phone: (513)-724-3313   Fax: (513) 536-7149   Email: deekeith@gmail.com
Office Hours: Monday - Saturday 8:30AM to 5:30PM
Contact Us
Please call or email today to schedule a visit
SHARING SLEEP

Since the very beginning of time mothers and babies have been sleeping together, with out shared sleep the human race could not have survived. Babies would have frozen to death or been carried off by predators if they hadn't.
Did you know night time is easier with a breastfeeding baby. Babies should be kept  close to mom at night for easier breastfeeding. Either in a bedside co-sleeper, in your bed if you have properly prepared for safe sleep or at the very least in a crib in your room, not down the hall. A safe sleeping environment can take many forms. But if it happens to be your bed, take a few simple precautions. 
Fluffy bedding or pillows and blankets should be kept away from baby. Baby should not be placed on the outside of the bed, too prevent falls. Make certain that the top of the mattress doesn't have a space baby could become trapped in, like wise for the mattress foot and sides. 
Studies show that infants who sleep in close proximity of their mothers are at a greatly reduced risk for SIDS. 

 Mom doesn't have to arise to feed her nursing baby if baby is kept with in arms reach. After feeding babies typically roll to their backs. Back sleeping has been associated with a reduction in the number of SIDS cases. If placing your baby in a crib follow the same guidelines, no stuffed animals or fancy bedding.

Some infants who have slept in unsafe environments,smoking mother, father or family member, sharing a bed with a sibling or sleeping on an unsafe surface, sharing sleep with an intoxicated parent  have had a greater risk of death. Sleeping on sofas, and or in a chair is also associated with an increased risk. But don't mistake suffocation for SIDS. SIDS is a sudden infant death that is unexplainable . Yet no evidence exists that a healthy full term infant of a breastfeeding non smoking mother in a safe environment is at a greater risk for suffocation or SIDS actually just the opposite. Please see James McKenna's PhD book and website for more information on sharing sleep with your baby for more information on safe sleep. 
http://al.nd.edu/about-arts-and-letters/news/infant-co-sleeping-expert-james-mckenna-authors-new-book/
Dee Keith, IBCLC, RLC, LLLL
Breastfeeding help, because it does matter!
The picture below shows a mother sleeping with her nursing baby, the only caveat I would add is that the pillow should be farther away from the baby. 
HomeTen stepsAbout DeeSharing Sleep/Contact usAnswers to questionsLinks

Phone: 513-724-3313
E-mail: deekeith@gmail.com
 by appointment